Balanced Dog Training

 My method of training creates engagement with your dog, without the use of food. 

My method of training creates engagement with your dog, without the use of food. 

My method of training is known as balanced dog training. The fundamental principle of dog training is pressure on, pressure off. Pressure can be spatial, verbal, and/or physical. During our training together, your dog will learn how the pressure is turned on, and how they can choose to turn off the pressure. My approach begins by creating a new set of rules, structure, boundaries, and communication to help your dog achieve a calm, and relaxed state of mind. Your dog’s new mindset is crucial to diminishing unruly behaviors. I will show you how to calmly communicate with your dog. I do not use intimidation, domination, or yelling. With my method of balanced training, you will never have to communicate with your dog in a frustrated or angry way.

My unique approach to dog training is geared more toward a fundamental state of mind change, as opposed to expecting your dog to perform strictly rehearsed behaviors. In other words, I am more concerned with creating a happy, healthy, balanced dog than creating a dog that simply knows a few obedience commands. The essence of my balanced dog training approach is not only to train your dog to behave as a calm family dog, but to also have a dog that you can turn "on" and "off" at any moment. Playtime, and excitement can be on command, with calm relaxation also on command. Creating this command structure is an excellent way to ensure your dog’s behavior is pleasant and predictable. 

During our dog training sessions, you will learn how and when to apply pressure, and when to release pressure in order to calmly achieve results. Our goal is to correct bad behavior, and to train your dog to understand impulse control. In short, I will show you, and your dog, how to calmly make better choices. I believe it is important to always correct bad behavior the instant it occurs. Dogs exist in the present moment, they require us to exist in the present with them. The virtue of correcting instantly is to prevent your dog from intensely acting out either by barking, lunging, growling, whining, etc. By consistently applying pressure, and releasing when better behavior is presented, your dog will learn to calmly make better choices. When you correct the subtle bad behavior, you will avoid having to be challenged with much more dramatic bad behavior.  
  
Together we will follow this four-step process:

  1. Command
  2. Pressure
  3. Release (reward)
  4. Repetition & Consistency

THE BALANCED DOG TRAINING PLAN

I will recommend a training plan with the following elements: 

  • Regular use of training tools such as: a prong collar, dominant dog collar, or remote collar
  • Crate training (crating overnight, as well as when your dog is unsupervised)
  • At least a one hour long daily structured walk (duration is flexible depending on age, health, and breed)
  • Treadmill walk training
  • Waiting for food
  • Waiting for thresholds
  • Regular use of the “place” command
  • All family members must follow the training plan (dog walker too)
  • All dogs in the home must follow the same training plan

If you adhere to the balanced training plan provided, you will see your dog’s bad behavior resolved. 

During our training together I will use the following three types of pressure.

Spatial pressure is when you position your body strategically to claim space. I use spatial pressure to communicate as well as guide the dog into completing a command. There is a difference between intimidation and guidance. The idea when using spatial pressure is to keep the dog engaged in training, not scare the dog into compliance. Depending upon the personality of a dog, this can be a delicate balance, but I am happy to show you how this technique can be used safely and effectively when training your dog. 

Verbal pressure is when you use a correction word, for example “no.” Typically, as the training progresses into advanced obedience, you will be able to say “no” and have your dog respond without having to use either physical, or even spatial pressure. 

Physical pressure is any kind of physical connection made between the handler and the dog. This can range from a correction with the leash and training collar, to a physical touch with the hand or foot. Applying physical pressure does not require hitting or kicking the dog. 

The value of my training, is when my clients see a huge improvement in their dog’s behavior, after our first training session, and as our training progresses. My clients who consistently use the training plan provided, continue to build a relationship with their dog, that they had previously only imagined.

Balanced Dog Training Tools

 These are various training tools I use. Starting from the left: Slip lead, leather leash, leather traffic leash, nylon dominant dog collar, pet convincer, Einstein mini remote collar, carabiners large & small, prong collars small, medium, large, and a tennis ball. Depending upon the behavioral issues involved, each of these items can be used safely and effectively to train a calm family dog.

These are various training tools I use. Starting from the left: Slip lead, leather leash, leather traffic leash, nylon dominant dog collar, pet convincer, Einstein mini remote collar, carabiners large & small, prong collars small, medium, large, and a tennis ball. Depending upon the behavioral issues involved, each of these items can be used safely and effectively to train a calm family dog.

Traditionally, I perform basic obedience training with Herm Sprenger prong collars, nylon dominant dog collars, Educator remote collars, and a product called Pet Convincer. The reason why I choose to rely on these dog training tools is because they work. In my experience, walking a dog in the heel position can be achieved using a properly fitted prong collar or a nylon training collar depending upon the circumstances. I rely on the Herm Sprenger brand prong collar because it is a safe, durable, quality product. My goal is to teach you and your dog to simply enjoy a calm walk side by side. Using a properly fitted, prong collar, coupled with calm corrections, will prevent your dog from pulling, marking territory, jumping, leash biting, dog fighting, barking, and other aggressive dog behavior. The reason why heeling is important is to establish you are the pack leader. I invite you to watch my free training videos on YouTube to help you understand what it is like to train with me, and also how I use balanced training tools. Pet Convincer is a harmless, burst of chemical-free cool air designed for correcting all sorts of unsavory behavior. The virtue of Pet Convincer is that when used properly it can provide an excellent distraction for the dog if you are looking to interrupt fixating behavior. 

 

 

Visit the testimonial page to discover how obedience training has positively changed the lives of my clients.

How does a prong collar work exactly? 

 Frankie heeling with his owners. Frankie, a boxer mastiff mix, had a serious issue with leash reactivity. Whenever he saw a person or dog he would have a major barking, lunging, growling fit. After Frankie bit two different people, his owners reached out for training help. If you are struggling with a similar situation, know that there is hope! That kind of behavior is completely resolvable! Watch Frankie's training video by clicking  here .

Frankie heeling with his owners. Frankie, a boxer mastiff mix, had a serious issue with leash reactivity. Whenever he saw a person or dog he would have a major barking, lunging, growling fit. After Frankie bit two different people, his owners reached out for training help. If you are struggling with a similar situation, know that there is hope! That kind of behavior is completely resolvable! Watch Frankie's training video by clicking here.

If properly fitted, the prong collar is designed to give an evenly applied correction. As the dog experiences a correction, pressure from the individual prongs on the collar is evenly applied to the dog. The handler releases the pressure the instant the command is executed. This training tool is meant as a momentary correction. Pressure on. Pressure off. For example: the momentary pressure goes on when the dog chooses to walk out of the “heel” position. Pressure is released the instant the dog returns to the “heel” position. The duration of a correction is typically one second or less. The idea is to get the dog's attention and calmly move on.

The virtue of a prong collar (again, when properly fitted) is that pressure during a correction is evenly applied. Which is different from many styles of training collars such as flat collars, metal training collars (also known as choke chains), martingale collars (commonly used in dog shelters), and nylon dominant dog collars. When a correction is not applied in time before the dog exits the “heel” position, the handler ends up inadvertently choking the dog as the dog pulls in front of the handler. When not properly used, these various other training collars, can cause the dog to not only experience a choking sensation, but uneven pressure is applied to its neck. From my perspective, I see the choking dog at the end of the leash in front of the handler, as operating in a state of confused adrenaline.

 Zoe a chocolate lab, heeling with her owner. They went from a very stressful walk, with a lot of pulling  and discomfort to a very calm heeling walk. Zoe's owner was not initially comfortable with using a prong collar, but soon after applying my method had absolutely no regrets. Read her testimonial by clicking  here .

Zoe a chocolate lab, heeling with her owner. They went from a very stressful walk, with a lot of pulling  and discomfort to a very calm heeling walk. Zoe's owner was not initially comfortable with using a prong collar, but soon after applying my method had absolutely no regrets. Read her testimonial by clicking here.

When training tools cause harm... 

 Frankie is an example of a dog that experienced a training tool, used improperly, which caused damage to his neck. Prior to being rescued by very dedicated clients, he was tied to a tree during Hurricane Sandy. He was wearing a metal training collar when someone tied his leash to the tree. Luckily he was rescued by an officer of the Bayonne, New Jersey Police Department. A veterinarian surgically removed the metal training collar from Frankie's neck. Later after he healed, his amazing owners contacted Good Karma Training for basic obedience training.    

Frankie is an example of a dog that experienced a training tool, used improperly, which caused damage to his neck. Prior to being rescued by very dedicated clients, he was tied to a tree during Hurricane Sandy. He was wearing a metal training collar when someone tied his leash to the tree. Luckily he was rescued by an officer of the Bayonne, New Jersey Police Department. A veterinarian surgically removed the metal training collar from Frankie's neck. Later after he healed, his amazing owners contacted Good Karma Training for basic obedience training.  

Like with any tool, when it is not used properly, it can be ineffective or even cause harm. While I am familiar with the horror stories of neglect, where people say prong collars can become embedded into the dog’s neck, I have also heard of similar stories regarding flat nylon collars and metal training collars. I highly recommend removing the training collar when the dog is resting in its crate and playing with other dogs. It is also important to replace any training collar if the dog has outgrown the collar, or the collar is worn, rusted, or shows any other sign of deterioration. 

If you are using a training collar and your dog is choking at the end of the leash, then you might consider learning more about how to properly use the training collar, either from a media source, or by working with a dog trainer. In the past, I struggled with how to make a correction using a metal training collar. This is the tool I currently use on Karma. It is not an easy thing to coordinate making a correction when your dog is trying to yank your body all over the neighborhood. I can completely understand and relate to how awkward this looks and how frustrating it can be to learn. Using these training collars effectively is possible. Obtaining training to use a tool is a reasonable situation and absolutely nothing to be embarrassed about. If one training tool fails to work with either you or your dog, another tool will likely work. Never give up! I have used at least three different training tools on Karma until we arrived at the tool which worked best for both of us.

How to put on a prong collar

 Here is what a properly fitted prong collar looks like when it is secured to a flat collar on a furry dog.

Here is what a properly fitted prong collar looks like when it is secured to a flat collar on a furry dog.

 Prong collar safety includes securing the prong collar to a flat collar. If the prong collar should break away, the dog is still secured to the flat collar, via the clip. 

Prong collar safety includes securing the prong collar to a flat collar. If the prong collar should break away, the dog is still secured to the flat collar, via the clip. 

I recommend fitting the prong collar on your dog so that the collar is high up on the dog's neck. The prong collar should be snuggly fit. The prong collar should be snuggly fit, and rest behind the dog’s jawline and ears. The prong collar should never be pressed over the dog’s face in order to put it on. If improperly applied the prongs of the collar could injure the dog’s eyes. When fitting the collar, you must pinch one link at the narrowest part of the collar, in order to release an individual link and open the prong collar. Then the collar is placed around the dog's neck, (think about how you would put on a necklace). 

If the prong collar is too loose it can sag around the dog’s shoulders, which is ineffective when making a correction. Instead of an effective correction of pressure and release, the prongs rest into the dog’s shoulders contributing to constant state of correction (pressure). Being constantly corrected is confusing to the dog and will almost certainly slow the progress of any obedience training regimen. The key to good obedience training is to communicate clearly to the dog as to how their behavior can turn the pressure both on and off.

As a safety feature, I recommend connecting the prong collar to the dog's flat collar with a carabiner. This is a safety net of sorts. If the prong collar were to break away at any point, the flat collar will still be secured to the dog. The attached pictures should help to illustrate the safest most humane use of a prong collar. 

About harnesses and retractable leashes

I do not use any kind of harness during my training because in my experience, it is not possible to achieve the "heel" position with such an apparatus. My clients that have used harnesses were not only unable to have their dog walk at their side, but they also complained their dog was pulling them during the walk. Harnesses are excellent tools when used properly, for example in sledding, or even teaching a puppy to walk on stairs.

I do not use retractable leashes when I teach basic obedience. It is not ergonomic or comfortable when trying to make a correction during the instruction of commands. Instead I recommend my clients purchase a standard six foot nylon leash for training. If your dog has an issue with biting the leash, your best course of action is to purchase a leather leash. Retractable leashes are effective tools when teaching E-collar/remote collar training.

More about scandalous "shock collar" training

 Milo wearing his Einstein remote collar. This collar and slip lead have absolutely improved Milo's quality of life. He used to be severely leash reactive and dog aggressive. After implementing a consistent balanced training program, he is able to calmly greet other dogs.

Milo wearing his Einstein remote collar. This collar and slip lead have absolutely improved Milo's quality of life. He used to be severely leash reactive and dog aggressive. After implementing a consistent balanced training program, he is able to calmly greet other dogs.

I am also an E-collar/remote collar trainer. If your goal is to progress into advanced obedience training, and have complete freedom and dependability off-leash, inside, and outside of your home, my approach will provide you with real world results.

 This is an example of what my dog Bollywood looks like after remote collar training together outside for thirty minutes. See what a sleepy puppy he is? Our work together is anything but shocking and painful. Our work together is fun, and ultimately it helps Bollywood to behave as a calm family dog. As of March 2014 he is an 11-month-old puppy, and exceptionally well trained. And because of all of his exceptional training, Bollywood is included in 95% of my life.

This is an example of what my dog Bollywood looks like after remote collar training together outside for thirty minutes. See what a sleepy puppy he is? Our work together is anything but shocking and painful. Our work together is fun, and ultimately it helps Bollywood to behave as a calm family dog. As of March 2014 he is an 11-month-old puppy, and exceptionally well trained. And because of all of his exceptional training, Bollywood is included in 95% of my life.

The remote collar I am referring to has a past product connection to the original "shock collar" but the product has been developed to function at a much greater range than the earlier versions of the first "shock collar". For example the first generation of remote stimulation collars had a limited range of stimulation levels, such as high, higher, and highest...That is not a great product for training pet dogs with low levels of distraction or even low levels of working drive, for example a Shih Tzu. The original "shock collar" product was designed to function on a very distracted hunting dog during a hunt, or even a German Shepherd during protection training. When working with dogs which were bred for intense sporting experiences, the handler requires higher intensity stimulation to interrupt the dog to ensure safety of other animals and/or people depending upon the nature of the training experience. 

I exclusively train with a remote collar designed by E-Collar Technologies, Inc. . The product I use to train my personal dogs, as well as my client dogs is the Educator Mini. The Educator Mini has a stimulation range from 0-100, and personally, I cannot even feel any of the stimulation until I reach number 8. Stimulation level 8 is more like a small poke, not an earth shattering shock. The pet dogs I train in-home and outdoors typically work under a stimulation level of 10 indoors, and 25 outdoors. I perform low-level remote collar training, which means I find the dog's lowest working level, (meaning what number do they feel the small poke feeling at), and then I work with the dog at that level, guiding them through obedience commands. The level of stimulation is determined by what the dog subtlety responds to. I am trained to recognize the subtle queues used to identify the dog’s lowest working level of remote collar stimulation. 

I see remote collars as just another form of communication between people and their dogs. The pressure of the stimulation from the remote collar is not a painful experience. Low level stimulation work is meant to motivate the dog with a slight amount of pressure similar to pressure applied by a prong collar. I work with dogs on a regular basis that are clearly operating with this awesome product and these dogs are very happy to work through obedience commands, and enjoy off leash freedom. My impression of remote collar work is that it is SO much more humane and relaxing compared to just taking a dog off leash and hoping the dog comes back when called. Hope is not a strategy. Instead I choose to use tools to shape my reality, and ensure the dogs which are trained by me are responsive, safe, and calm family dogs. My dog method of dog training is performed with the utmost respect for your dog’s calm state of mind. 

Take a moment to consider how many places you could go with your dog if you were absolutely sure your dog had an exceptional level of obedience training and came when called each and every time.   Inclusion is a reward to you and your dog. Are you interested in balanced training? Then let's get started!


 Lupe, an adult pit bull mix was adopted by her owner from Liberty Humane Society in 2013. When Lupe became human aggressive within a month of the adoption her owner was advised to euthanize Lupe. After experiencing Good Karma Training's board and train rehabilitation program, Lupe is not only alive and well, her obedience training is remarkable. Here Lupe and her owner are enjoying the freedom of off leash remote collar training in Colorado while on vacation. 

Lupe, an adult pit bull mix was adopted by her owner from Liberty Humane Society in 2013. When Lupe became human aggressive within a month of the adoption her owner was advised to euthanize Lupe. After experiencing Good Karma Training's board and train rehabilitation program, Lupe is not only alive and well, her obedience training is remarkable. Here Lupe and her owner are enjoying the freedom of off leash remote collar training in Colorado while on vacation. 

The adorable picture above was sent to me along with a behavior update by Lupe's owner. I appreciate staying in touch with my clients. It is really a great feeling to hear my clients consistently practicing the training plan provided. Being able to transition from feeling fearful, and anxious about spending time with their dog to feeling calm, and confident about involving their dog in daily activities, is truly a remarkable experience for any dog owner who has ever struggled to trust their own dog. 

The best part about using balanced training tools and methods, is that you can take your dog anywhere with you. Often, I hear people say, "But if you don't offer treats, where's the dog's pay check?" The reward in balanced training is inclusion. My clients have dogs they can take along with them to enjoy everyday moments. No hotdog and cheese bits required. No frantic barking dog locked away in another room, excluded from the party...Just a calm family dog, that knows what behavior is expected of them.

Interested in learning more about my rates? Click here.

 Milo calmly meeting friends. Prior to Milo's balanced training experience meeting other dogs was simply not possible. He was a growling, lunging, barking, hysterical mess. -Now, thanks to Good Karma Training, he can calmly greet other dogs. 

Milo calmly meeting friends. Prior to Milo's balanced training experience meeting other dogs was simply not possible. He was a growling, lunging, barking, hysterical mess. -Now, thanks to Good Karma Training, he can calmly greet other dogs. 

 Milo in a sit/stay. I do not actually train the word "stay". The idea is the dog is expected to sit until released from the sit command. Keeping a dog on command, manages the dog's state of mind, which can be highly relaxing to a dog like Milo with a history of leash reactivity, and dog aggression. 

Milo in a sit/stay. I do not actually train the word "stay". The idea is the dog is expected to sit until released from the sit command. Keeping a dog on command, manages the dog's state of mind, which can be highly relaxing to a dog like Milo with a history of leash reactivity, and dog aggression.